Diabetes and Hypertension in Rural Hispanics

Research center:
Lead researcher:
Arch Mainous, PhD, 843.792.6986
Project completed:
January 2005

This project examined the similarities and differences between rural and urban Hispanic and Caucasian adults diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are common and potentially disabling chronic diseases. Rural and minority populations have historically had problems accessing care and are particularly vulnerable to the consequences of lower access to care. Despite the evidence from the early 1990s that diabetes is more prevalent among Hispanics and that rural populations have barriers to care that may negatively impact health care services for patients with diabetes, it is unclear whether rural Hispanics are disproportionately affected. Further, in comparison to urban residents the extent of decreased services may be a particular issue for timely diagnosis of diabetes in rural Hispanic patients. Language barriers may have particular implications for providing care in this population. Addressing these issues has significant implications for rural health policy and the distribution of manpower and resources.

The project had two specific objectives:

  • To examine the similarities and differences between rural Hispanic and Caucasian adults diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and hypertension as well as urban Hispanic and Caucasian adults in terms of diabetes and blood pressure control and complications using the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).
  • To examine the prevalence of undetected diabetes mellitus and hypertension among rural Hispanics, rural Caucasians, urban Hispanics and urban Caucasians using the NHANES.

Publications