South Carolina Rural Health Research Center

Products

Listed by publication date. You can also view these publications alphabetically.

For a complete list of publications from the Center, which may include older publications and publications funded by other sources, please see the Center's website.

2017

  • Chartbook: Trends in Rural Children’s Oral Health and Access to Care
    Chartbook
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2017
    Assessing progress at improving children’s oral health requires examining trends to see whether rural disparities, if present, are being reduced. Our report uses data from the National Survey of Children’s Health (2003, 2007, and 2011- 2012) to assess progress in access to oral health care, and perceived status of teeth among rural children.
  • Differences in Medicare Service Use in the Last Six Months of Life among Rural and Urban Dual – Eligible Beneficiaries
    Report
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2017
    In this brief, we compare rural and urban dual-eligible beneficiaries to Medicare-only beneficiaries in their service utilization in the last six months of life. Within rural beneficiaries, we further explore differences associated with race/ethnicity.
  • Improving Rural Oral Health: Six States’ Response to the United States Department of Health and Human Services Oral Health Strategic Framework
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2017
    The U.S. Public Health Service Oral Health Coordinating Committee published the Oral Health Strategic Framework 2014-2017. The framework includes 5 goals for advancing oral health in America. We explore how 6 states have responded to the Strategic Framework; specifically, how they address oral health inter-professional practice, and access to care.
  • Rural-Urban Differences in Medicare Service Use in the Last Six Months of Life
    Report
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2017
    This brief focuses on the current status of healthcare use during the last six months of life among Medicare beneficiaries. We used data from a sample of Medicare beneficiary claims to assess whether service utilization differed between rural and urban decedents and across decedents of different race/ethnicity categories.
  • Transitions in Care Among Rural Residents with Congestive Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia
    Report
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2017
    Rural and urban hospitals vary with regard to the levels of care they are able to provide, requiring that a subset of patients be transferred from the first point of encounter to a second facility. The degree to which inter-hospital transfers occur, and the outcomes for transfer patients, have not been studied across rural and urban institutions.
  • Trends in Rural Children’s Health and Access to Care
    Chartbook
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2017
    The past ten years have seen positive trends in the availability of health insurance coverage for children. This project examines data from three iterations of the National Survey of Children’s Health to see if rural children have benefitted equally from any improvements in health insurance, healthcare use, and health status.

2016

  • Colonoscopy Access and Utilization – Rural Disparities in the Carolinas, 2001-2010
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 07/2016
    This study aims to use data on where patients travel for their colonoscopies to determine the extent to which access is changing over space and time, and to better understand utilization patterns among rural residents of North and South Carolina between 2001 and 2010.
  • Looking Ahead: Rural-Urban Differences in Anticipated Need for Aging-Related Assistance
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 07/2016
    Rural older adults with a disability can anticipate a longer lifespan than urban adults. Rural areas tend to be served by fewer providers of home health services. This brief describes the degree to which rural and urban pre-retirement age adults, persons ages 40-64, anticipate the need for assistance later in life and where they obtain such help.
  • Vulnerable Rural Counties: The Changing Landscape, 2000-2010
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 07/2016
    This brief illustrates the distribution of rural vulnerable populations and the challenges they face. Understanding the demography of rural America is vital to understanding what programs, interventions and policy initiatives are needed to improve health care access, delivery and outcomes.

2015

  • Free Clinics in the Rural Safety Net, 2014
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2015
    This brief explores two issues. First, it examines where free clinics are located and describes their availability in rural counties across all 50 states. Second, through telephone interviews with leadership at 14 of the 21 state free clinic associations, it explores the issues they face.
  • Post-discharge Rehabilitation Care Delivery for Rural Medicare Beneficiaries with Stroke
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2015
    Provision/type of post-discharge rehab care (PDRC) received by stroke survivors by rurality and race/ethnicity are examined as are the distances between their homes and the discharge hospitals related to the type of PDRC recommended. The brief also looks at whether factors such as initial hospital admission relate to the PDRC provision/type.
  • Area Deprivation is Higher Among Rural Counties - But Not All Rural Counties are Deprived
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2015
    This brief is one of two on the role of residence/community deprivation on potentially avoidable hospitalizations (PAH) of children. It details development of an area deprivation index, examines area deprivation across all U.S. counties, and describes findings when applied to rates of PAH among a nine-state sample of children.
  • The Intersection of Residence and Area Deprivation: The Case of Hospitalizations from Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions Among Children
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2015
    This brief is the second in a series providing information on the role of residence and community deprivation on potentially avoidable hospitalizations among children. This brief describes the findings from a nine-state sample of children’s hospitalizations and discusses the potential implications for rural health research and policy.

2014

2013

  • Diffusion of Preventive Innovation: Racial and Rural Differences in Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Practices
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 05/2013
    This report examines differences associated with residence and race/ethnicity in receipt of cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination.
  • Dental Sealant Utilization Among Rural and Urban Children
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 03/2013
    This report examines the proportion of rural children who have received dental sealants applied to the surface of their teeth to prevent or delay the development of dental decay.
  • Dialysis Availability in Rural America
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2013
    This study explores the availability of dialysis services in rural America, including the prevalence of dialysis use across urban and rural counties, travel distance for services, and dialysis quality outcomes.
  • HIV/AIDS in Rural America (Key Facts)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2013
    This report describes the proportion of the population affected by HIV/AIDS.
  • HIV/AIDS in Rural America: Prevalence and Service Availability
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2013
    This report examines the prevalence of HIV/AIDS in rural counties across 28 states in 2008 and the rural-versus-urban distribution of Ryan White providers.
  • Rural Border Health Chartbook
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2013
    The chartbook examines potential geographic and ethnic disparities among U.S. border residents and describes select indicators related to access to care, women's preventive services, oral health, infectious and communicable diseases, and mental health that have been identified as disparities.
  • Rural Border Health Chartbook (Key Facts)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2013
    This report examines potential geographic and ethnic disparities among U.S. border residents and describes select indicators related to access to care, women's preventive services, oral health, infectious and communicable diseases, and mental health that have been identified as disparities.

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

  • Health Disparities: A Rural-Urban Chartbook (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 12/2008
    Rural minorities experience disparities in health and health care delivery. Previous studies have illustrated many of the health disparities experienced by rural residents, such as poorer health status, higher obesity prevalence, more with activity limitations, and higher mortality rates. The Chartbook seeks to expand the work of the National Healthcare Disparities Reports, issued annually by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. These Reports are limited in their discussion of disparities experienced by rural residents and present little data regarding disparities among rural minority populations. The present Chartbook expands upon prior work by examining potential disparities among rural populations in health, health behaviors, preventive services and diabetes care.
  • Health Disparities: A Rural-Urban Chartbook (Full Report)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 06/2008
    Rural minorities experience disparities in health and health care delivery. Previous studies have illustrated many of the health disparities experienced by rural residents, such as poorer health status, higher obesity prevalence, more with activity limitations, and higher mortality rates. The Chartbook seeks to expand the work of the National Healthcare Disparities Reports, issued annually by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. These Reports are limited in their discussion of disparities experienced by rural residents and present little data regarding disparities among rural minority populations. The present Chartbook expands upon prior work by examining potential disparities among rural populations in health, health behaviors, preventive services and diabetes care.
  • Chartbook: Dental Health and Access to Care among Rural Children: A National and State Portrait (Full Report)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 03/2008

    Although children's dental health in the U.S. has improved over recent decades, a subset of children continues to suffer dental disease severe enough to constitute a public health problem. This Chartbook examines dental health status, use of preventive services, and dental insurance among rural and urban children. The Chartbook provides information specific to rural children, and in particular rural minority children, not available in similar detail from other sources. This information can be used at the state level for program planning and assessment.

2007

2006

2005

  • Early Alcohol Use, Rural Residence, and Adulthood Employment
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2005
    Findings indicate that drinking during youth and early adulthood was common in the early 1980's. Nearly half (47.6%) of respondents reported drinking before age 18, and 55.3% reported binge drinking. Drinking behaviors did not differ significantly between rural and urban residents, and rural youth surveyed in 1979-1983 were as likely as their urban counterparts to start drinking before the age of 18, binge drink before 18, and report that work or school was impacted by drinking.
  • Rural Hospitals and Spanish Speaking Patients with Limited English Proficiency
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2005
    Reports that 40 million Latinos in the United States, 14.2% of the population, have limited English proficiency (LEP), which can lead to poor health outcomes in the absence of effective medical interpretation or translation services.
  • Trends in Uninsurance among Rural Minority Children
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2005
    Disparities in health insurance coverage for both minority and rural children persist, with children who are simultaneously minority race/ethnicity and living in rural areas being particularly disadvantaged. Using twenty-one years of data from the National Health Interview Survey to explore trends in health insurance and health services utilization for children between 1980 and 2001, and focusing on non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic African American, and Hispanic children, the authors found that rural children have been consistently less likely to have insurance than urban children, and minority status adds to the disparity. Several factors consistently influenced the odds that a child would lack health insurance, measured in 1980, 1986, 1994 and 2001. Compared to urban white children, rural white children and Hispanic children, both urban and rural, were more likely to lack insurance. Factors consistently associated with lack of health insurance, such as poverty, low education, and non-parental households, have been more prevalent among minority children since 1979, and remained so in 2001. Rural disadvantages for minority children are marked.
  • Disability Burdens Among Older Americans Associated with Gender and Race/Ethnicity in Rural and Urban Areas
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2005
    No prior research has investigated differences in disability-free and disabled life expectancy associated with rural or urban residence. This report addresses this gap, and identifies differences in healthy life expectancy that may signal important policy needs. The authors examined total life expectancy, disability-free life expectancy, and disabled life expectancy, comparing people in rural and urban areas. These expectancy measures for subgroups of rural and urban areas were compared, distinguished by sex, race (white and African American) and educational attainment. The authors found that among a cohort of Americans aged 65 to 69 in 1982, in seven of the eight subgroups, individuals in rural areas lived longer lives than those in urban areas. Rural as compared to urban people lived (a) more disability-free years, (b) more disabled years, and (c) a notably greater percentage of their lives with a disability. There were striking differences among the high and low education groups, with individuals with more education living substantially longer, less disabled lives. Women lived longer, more disabled lives than men. For most subgroups, African Americans lived shorter, more disabled lives than whites.
  • Effects of Uninsurance during the Preceding 10 Years on Health Status among Rural Working Age Adults
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2005
    In a population just reaching age 40, continuous health insurance coverage across the preceding 8 to 10 years was not associated with better self-perceived health than interrupted coverage. However, continuous insurance coverage was significantly related to better mental health, with the effect persisting in multivariable analysis controlling for residence, race, and demographic characteristics. Rural residents reaching age 40 in 1998 or 2000 were less likely to have been continuously insured between 1989-2000 than were their urban peers.
  • Mental Health Risk Factors, Unmet Needs, and Provider Availability for Rural Children
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2005
    The study used the 2001 National Health Interview Survey to assess the prevalence of sub-clinical mental health problems among children, the degree to which children with potential problems use mental health and general providers for these problems, and the degree of unmet need. Key findings include: 1) Nearly 1 of every 4 rural children has a potential mental health problem as derived from the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ).; 2) Age, sex, family income, parental education, living situation, health insurance status, and previously diagnosed developmental disorder were all associated with sub-clinical mental health problems in children.; 3) Less than 1 out of 5 parents of rural or urban children with sub-clinical mental health problems had seen or talked to a mental health professional about the child in the past 12 months.; and 4) Characteristics associated with mental health care utilization were race/ethnicity, insurance status, level of education in the child's family, living situation, and previous diagnosis of a developmental disorder. Among roughly 2.9 million rural children with a potential mental health problem as defined by the SDQ score, two thirds (68.1%) are living in a HPSA-mental health designated area. This translates to over 1.9 million children with mental health problems but living in areas where very minimal to no resources are available for their care.
  • Poverty, Stress, and Violent Disagreements in the Home Among Rural Families
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2005
    This study used information from a large, nationally representative telephone survey of households with children, carried out by the National Center for Health Statistics, to explore the prevalence of violent disagreements in the home. "Violent" disagreements are those that involve hitting or throwing, as opposed to heated argument or calm discussion. Poverty and parenting stress also were examined as they are hypothesized to be associated with violent disagreement. Findings from the study showed that rural children, all things held equal, were less likely than urban children to live in households where disagreements are expressed violently. Similarly, rural children were less likely to live in households with high parenting stress or low reported neighborhood trust. Nonetheless, rural practitioners must still be sensitive to the possibility of exposure to violence. Key factors associated with parenting stress, and thus with violent disagreements, are more prevalent in rural areas. Poverty and low-income were more common among rural than urban children, and affected well over half of rural minority children, in particular.
  • Depression in Rural Populations: Prevalence, Effects on Life Quality, And Treatment-Seeking Behavior
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 05/2005
    Using the National Health Interview Survey and the NHIS-administered depression scale from the Comprehensive International Diagnostic Interview to explore depression among rural versus urban residents, the authors found that the prevalence of major depression was significantly higher among rural (6.11%) than among urban (5.16%) populations. However, nearly all individuals scoring positive for depression reported that their symptoms interfered with their life or activities (46.67% rural, 44.25% urban). Persons without any health insurance were less likely to have communicated with a physician than were the privately or publicly insured. Additionally, the likelihood that an individual with depression would have communicated with a practitioner rose as the person's self reported health declined.
  • Violence And Rural Teens: Teen Violence, Drug Use, And School-Based Prevention Services In Rural America
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 03/2005
    Describes a study which had three main purposes: (1) to explore the prevalence of violence-related exposures and drug use among rural teens, (2) to investigate the effects of race and gender on the risk of exposure to violence and drug use, and (3) to compare the policies and mental health care services of rural and urban schools. This study found no evidence to support the common assumption that rural youth are protected from exposure to violence. Rural teens are equally or more likely than suburban and urban teens to be exposed to violent activities, including weapons carrying, fighting, fear of violence, and suicide behaviors. Rural teens are at significantly greater risk of using cigarettes, chewing tobacco, crack/cocaine, and steroids than both suburban and urban teens. Of important note is the high prevalence of "crystal-meth" use among rural teens.
  • Depression in Rural Populations: Prevalence, Effects on Life Quality, and Treatment-Seeking Behavior (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    To explore the prevalence of selected mental health diagnoses across rural populations, including rural minority residents, they studied information obtained by the 1999 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a nationally representative survey of more than 30,000 U.S. adults.
  • Disability Burdens Among Older Americans in Rural and Urban Area
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Examines differences in disability-free and disabled life expectancy among rural or urban residents, using an indicator called "health expectancy."
  • Effects of Race and Poverty on Perceived Stress Among Rural Women
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
  • Effects of Uninsurance during the Preceding 10 Years On Health Status among Rural Working Age Adults (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Used a long-running panel survey, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth that began in 1979, to examine the effects of gaps in health insurance coverage on how individuals rate their physical and mental health.
  • Mental Health Risk Factors, Unmet Needs, and Provider Availability for Rural Children (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Children in rural areas have fewer mental health resources available. To assess the need for services among rural children, they studied information from the 2001 National Health Interview Survey, a nationally representative survey of the U.S. population. Possible mental health problems were identified based on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ).
  • More May Be Better: Evidence of a Negative Relationship Between Physician Supply and Hospitalization for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    The authors conducted an empirical test of the relationship between physician supply and hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSH). Principal findings showed that in the urban models for ages 0-17 physician supply has the largest negative adjusted relationship with ACSH. For ages 18-39 and 40-64, physician supply has the second largest negative adjusted relationship with ACSH. Physician supply was not associated with ACSH in rural areas. The authors conclude that physician supply is positively associated with the overall performance of the primary health care system in a large sample of urban counties of the United States.
  • Rural Hospitals and Spanish Speaking Patients with Limited English Proficiency (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Brief overview of findings from a study of how rural hospitals are meeting the needs of patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP).
  • Trends in Uninsurance Among Rural Minority Children (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Describes childhood disparities found in health insurance, health care utilization, and factors related to acquiring health insurance.
  • Violence and Rural Teens: Teen Violence, Drug Use, and School-Based Prevention Services in Rural America (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Fact sheet covering the key findings from a study of violence and drug use among rural teens.

2004

2003

  • Rural Minority Children's Access To And Timeliness Of Immunizations: 1993-2001
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 11/2003
    The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of pediatric health care provided to rural minorities using timeliness of immunization receipt as a marker for quality. Findings include: 1) Children living in rural areas are less likely to receive newly recommended vaccines within the first two years after introduction of the recommendation.; 2) There are no significant differences in the percentages of children up-to-date with their immunizations between Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics living in urban and rural areas.; 3) By 2001 lack of health insurance was the strongest predictor for children not receiving their immunizations in a timely manner.; 4) When using national surveys, there is significant year-to-year variation in the percentage of children who are up-to-date with their immunizations.
  • Prevalence of Health Related Behavioral Risk Factors Among Non-Metro Minority Adults
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2003
    Data on tobacco use, seat belt use, and alcohol consumption among rural minority adults. Includes recommendations and detailed data tables.
  • Emergency Department Use By Medically Indigent Rural Residents
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 07/2003
    Examined emergency department (ED) use, combining national data and South Carolina state data to estimate the uncompensated charges in rural EDs nationally and the ameliorating effects of rural community health centers on ED use by rural residents.
  • Hospitalization for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions: Asthma, Diabetes, and Congestive Heart Failure in South Carolina
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 05/2003
    Hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive conditions, diseases for which primary care in the preceding six months could have reduced or eliminated the need for hospitalization, are a commonly used indicator of disparities in access to care.
  • Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease among Rural African Americans
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 02/2003
    Investigates the association of race and rural residence on rates of diagnosis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease and indicators of good medical control among people with diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Finds that rural African Americans with diagnosed diabetes have significantly higher rates of problems associated with diabetes than do urban whites; that rural and urban African Americans are more likely than rural and urban whites to have undiagnosed diabetes; that rural African Americans with diagnosed hypertension are more likely than urban whites to still have elevated diastolic blood pressure; and that rural African Americans have the highest prevalence of undiagnosed diastolic hypertension. The study documents the need to improve access to health care services in rural areas.
  • Access to Care among Rural Minorities: Working Age Adults
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2003
    Examines the prevalence of health insurance and the use of physician services in rural areas. Findings include that rural minorities are handicapped by poverty and lack of education; low income and low education levels in non-metro areas translate into jobs that do not offer health insurance; and although non-metro adults were less likely to have insurance than metropolitan residents, they were not less likely to see a physician, with some exceptions.
  • Behavioral Risk Factors Among Rural African Americans (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Discusses seat belt use, tobacco use, and alcohol use among rural African Americans.
  • Behavioral Risk Factors Among Rural Hispanics (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Discusses seat belt use, tobacco use, and alcohol use among rural Hispanics.
  • Demand For Medical Services Among Previously Uninsured Children: The Roles of Race and Rurality (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Fact sheet examining the use of medical services over nearly two years among newly insured and continuously insured children, ages six through twelve, in the CHIP and Medicaid programs in South Carolina and West Virginia.
  • Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Rural African Americans (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Previous research has indicated that persons living in rural areas are more vulnerable to poor health than those living in urban areas. Minorities in particular are more vulnerable to poor health than non-minorities.
  • Diagnostic Risk Factors & Improvement Activities Among Rural African Americans (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Discusses disease management among rural African Americans.
  • Diagnostic Risk Factors & Improvement Activities Among Rural Hispanics (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Discusses disease management among rural Hispanics.
  • Hospitalization for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions: Congestive Heart Failure, Diabetes and Asthma in South Carolina (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Brief overview of findings from a study of hospitalizations in South Carolina for ambulatory care sensitive conditions. A full report is also available.
  • Rural Minority Children (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Fact sheet providing data on rural minority children's health insurance coverage, health care use, poverty and education.
  • Rural Minority Elders (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Fact sheet providing data on health status, health insurance coverage, education and income of rural elders.
  • Rural Minority Working Age Adults (Fact Sheet)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2003
    Holding demographic considerations equal, rural residents are less likely to report having health insurance than urban residents. African Americans, Hispanics and persons of other race are all less likely to be insured than whites. The factors placing rural minorities at risk for lacking insurance include low income and low education.

2002

  • Hypertension, Diabetes, Cholesterol, Weight, and Weight Control Activities Among Non Metro Minority Adults
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 12/2002
    The 1998 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) included a detailed examination of preventive health problems and behaviors. This report uses data from the 1998 NHIS to examine the prevalence of selected problems among rural populations, with an emphasis on rural minorities. ?Rural? was defined, following NHIS guidelines, as living in a non-MSA county.
  • Access to Care among Rural Minorities: Children
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 11/2002
    Profiles the characteristics of non-metro children, their health insurance coverage, and their health care visits. Recommends a multi-faceted approach to ensure that non-metro children obtain appropriate levels of health care. Facets including retaining and expanding provision of care to indigent and low-income families, expanding insurance coverage, and addressing rural poverty.
  • Access to Care Among Rural Minorities: Children (Appendix - Methods, Data Sources, and Detailed Tables)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 11/2002
    Appendix of report on rural minority children and the factors affecting their health insurance coverage and health services use.
  • Access to Care Among Rural Minorities: Older Adults
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2002
    Profiles health status of, and use of physicians by, non-metro older adults. Programmatic recommendations based on the findings: maintain programs that encourage providers to practice in non-metro areas, pay particular attention to the problems of the near-poor African-American elderly, and foster coalitions linking providers with voluntary community-based organizations to increase support services to elderly non-metro populations.
  • Access to Care Among Rural Minorities: Older Adults (Appendix - Methods, Data, and Detailed Tables)
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2002
    Appendix of report on health status and health services use among poor and minority older adults in non-metro areas.
  • Demand for Medical Services Among Previously Uninsured Children: The Roles of Race and Rurality
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2002
    Examined the use of medical services over nearly two years among newly insured and continuously insured children, ages six through twelve, in the CHIP and Medicaid programs in West Virginia and South Carolina. The study focused on the patterns of medical care utilization in the children, and found that there was not a significant change in utilization patterns among newly insured children in general. There were findings that newly insured children illustrated delayed demand and actually used fewer health services initially than their continually insured peers.
  • Minorities in Rural America: An Overview of Population Characteristics
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2002
    Presents an overview of demographic and economic statistics pertaining to rural minority populations and addresses the following questions: Where do rural minorities live? How is the rural minority population distributed across ages and sexes? What is the economic structure of rural, minority communities? What health resources are available in rural, minority communities? Findings pertaining to each minority group are presented in separate chapters. Based on the findings, the authors make several recommendations regarding issues ranging from program participation to infrastructure to research.
  • Minorities in Rural America: Appendix A Description of Method and Supporting Tables Tables Ordered by Chapter
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2002
    Appendix of a report that gives an overview of demographic and economic statistics pertaining to rural minority populations.
  • Minorities in Rural America: Appendix B Map Supplement
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2002
    Appendix to report on overview of demographic and economic statistics pertaining to rural minority populations. Maps.
  • Minorities in Rural America: Appendix C Economic Patterns in Non-Metro America
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2002
    Appendix to report on an overview of demographic and economic statistics pertaining to rural minority populations. Focuses on economic status and health services infrastructure.

2001