Saundra Glover, PhD

South Carolina Rural Health Research Center

Phone: 803.251.6317
Email: sglover@mailbox.sc.edu

University of South Carolina


Completed Projects - (5)


Publications - (9)

  • Assessment Of Barriers To The Delivery Of Medicare Reimbursed Diabetes Self-Management Education In Rural Areas
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2004
    Explores the barriers that rural practitioners face in providing diabetes education services to Medicare beneficiaries. Survey results from a random sample of ADA-recognized diabetes education facilities indicated that insufficient Medicare reimbursement, staffing, institutional support as well as the ADA recognition process all constituted barriers to diabetes self-management education in rural areas.
  • Barriers Associated With the Delivery of Medicare Reimbursed Diabetes Self-Management Education
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 11/2005
    Explores the barriers that practitioners face in providing diabetes self-management education to Medicare beneficiaries. Barriers identified for rural providers include costs, the shortage of designated specialists, fewer resources, amount of Medicare reimbursement, transportation and more.
  • Handling the Handoff: Rural and Race-Based Disparities in Post Hospitalization Follow-up Care Among Medicare Beneficiaries with Diabetes
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2011
    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases, affecting an estimated 23.6 million people in the United States (7.8% of the total population). Rural African American and Hispanic residents with diabetes are less likely to exhibit good control of their condition, putting them at greater risk for the consequences of this disease, such as kidney failure, blindness and amputation. Effective outpatient care is key to diabetes management. Absence of such care, conversely, may play a role in poorer diabetes control in rural areas. The present report uses information regarding Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes to examine the provision of care in rural America. It provides estimates of hospital admission rates for rural Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes, tracks the proportion of patients who receive adequate outpatient care post discharge, and assesses subsequent readmissions to the hospital. It also explores the potential for race-based disparities in care for diabetes.
  • Higher Risk of Death in Rural Blacks and Whites Than Urbanites is Related to Lower Incomes, Education, and Health Coverage
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2011
    Explores the degree to which lack of health insurance may contribute to high mortality rates among rural minority men and women aged 45-64.
  • HIV/AIDS in Rural America: Prevalence and Service Availability
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2013
    Examines the prevalence of HIV/AIDS in rural counties across 28 states in 2008 and the rural-versus-urban distribution of Ryan White providers.
  • Lower Rehospitalization Rates among Rural Medicare Beneficiaries with Diabetes
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2012
    Evaluates 30-day readmission rates of Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes in rural areas.
  • Missing the Handoff: Post-Hospitalization Follow-up Care Among Rural Medicare Beneficiaries with Diabetes
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2012
    Analyzes urban and rural differences in post-discharge physician follow-up care using data from 2005 Medicare claims files.
  • Poorer Quality Outcomes of Medicare-Certified Home Health Care in Areas with High Levels of Native American/Alaska Native Residents
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 04/2015
    Examines CMS quality indicators in home healthcare to determine disparities in rural areas with high population of Native American or Alaska Natives.
  • Post-discharge Rehabilitation Care Delivery for Rural Medicare Beneficiaries with Stroke
    Policy Brief
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2015

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States (U.S.). Post-discharge care has been shown to be vital in preventing long-term morbidity and improving functionality and quality of life for stroke patients. The most appropriate post-discharge rehabilitation care (PDRC) setting for stroke patients depends on several factors including the patient’s clinical profile, patient preferences, provider recommendations, and proximity to available resources. Limited evidence suggests geographic as well as racial and ethnic disparities in receipt of PDRC. We sought to examine the following research questions:

    1. Are there differences in the provision and type of PDRC received post-discharge by rurality and race/ethnicity among stroke survivors?
    2. Is distance between the patient’s home and the discharge hospital related to the type of PDRC recommended?
    3. Are factors such as initial hospital admission (transfer from other hospital vs. referral from primary care vs. direct admission from emergency departments) related to PDRC provision and type?