P. Daniel Patterson, PhD, MPH, EMT-B

FORHP-funded Individual Grantees

Phone: 412.647.3183
Fax: 412.647.6999
Email: pattersond@upmc.edu

Department of Emergency Medicine
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
230 McKee Place, Suite 500
Pittsburgh, PA 15213


Publications - (12)

  • Becoming an Emergency Medical Technician: Urban-Rural Differences in Motivation and Job Satisfaction
    North Carolina Rural Health Research and Policy Analysis Center
    Date: 03/2007
    This study uses cross-sectional data from the 2003 national Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographic Study (LEADS) Project to explore urban-rural differences in why EMTs enter the field, what is important in their jobs, and whether they are satisfied with their profession.
  • Challenges for Rural Emergency Medical Services: Medical Oversight
    North Carolina Rural Health Research and Policy Analysis Center
    Date: 05/2008
    This Findings Brief examines the challenges faced by local rural EMS agencies in obtaining a medical director and ensuring medical oversight for EMS personnel, and also describes how the challenges faced in rural areas differ from those in urban ones. The data are from a national survey of 1,425 local EMS directors that was conducted in 2006-2007.
  • Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Activities Funded by the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program
    Maine Rural Health Research Center, North Carolina Rural Health Research and Policy Analysis Center
    Date: 02/2006
    Describes the EMS related activities that the 45 states receiving funding from the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility (Flex) Program proposed to conduct in fiscal year 2004-2005. Since the first full year of funding, the number and range of EMS improvement activities proposed has increased substantially states' proposals contained 239 documented EMS improvement activities. Of these, 40% focused on the Integration of Health Services attribute, 13% on Human Resource challenges, and 13% on Education Systems. Continued support of activities begun prior to 2004 was common. Report produced by the Flex Monitoring Project, funded by the Office of Rural Health Policy.
  • Emergency Medical Services and the Federal Government's Evolving Role: What Rural and Frontier Emergency Medical Services Advocates Should Know

    Date: 2006
    Examines the debate around recent recommendations for an expanded federal role in supporting Emergency Medical Services (EMS). If federal expansion were to occur, the author recommends that responsibility for EMS be placed in the Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Expected Annual Emergency Miles per Ambulance: An Indicator for Measuring Availability of Emergency Medical Services Resources
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 04/2006
    Proposes a county-level indicator of emergency medical services (EMS) resource availability that takes into consideration existing EMS resources, population health and demographics, and geographic factors. The indicator, the expected annual emergency miles per ambulance, provides a basis for comparing ambulance availability across counties.
  • Hypertension, Diabetes, Cholesterol, Weight, and Weight Control Activities Among Non Metro Minority Adults
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 12/2002
    The 1998 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) included a detailed examination of preventive health problems and behaviors. This report uses data from the 1998 NHIS to examine the prevalence of selected problems among rural populations, with an emphasis on rural minorities. ?Rural? was defined, following NHIS guidelines, as living in a non-MSA county.
  • Investigating Rural EMS Infrastructure: A Developmental Methodology For Measuring The Availability Of EMS Resources
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2004
    Explores a potential indicator of EMS availability, the Expected Annual Emergency Miles per Ambulance (EXAMB). The ambulance is used as the core unit of availability due to its importance for safe transport and the initiation of medical services. The EXAMB measure calculates expected annual emergency miles per ambulance beginning with the number of ambulances, the land area of a county as a proxy for distance, and county population. Findings showed that in three of the five states studied, EXAMB values varied in parallel with other measures of resource availability, and in all states, the EXAMB was positively related to the proportion of the county population in poverty.
  • Issues in Staffing Emergency Medical Services: A National Survey of Local Rural and Urban EMS Directors
    North Carolina Rural Health Research and Policy Analysis Center
    Date: 05/2008
    This report explores rural-urban differences in medical oversight and the recruitment and retention of emergency medical technicians (EMTs)and paramedics as reported by a survey of 1,425 local EMS directors.
  • Prevalence of Health Related Behavioral Risk Factors Among Non-Metro Minority Adults
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2003
    Data on tobacco use, seat belt use, and alcohol consumption among rural minority adults. Includes recommendations and detailed data tables.
  • Recruitment and Retention of EMTs: A Qualitative Study
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) are critical to out-of-hospital care, but maintaining staff can be difficult. The study objective was to identify factors that contribute to recruitment and retention of EMTs and paramedics.
  • Rural-Urban Differences in Characteristics of Local EMS Agencies
    North Carolina Rural Health Research and Policy Analysis Center
    Date: 05/2008
    This Findings Brief describes the general characteristics of local rural EMS agencies and important ways that they differ from the characteristics of agencies located in urban areas. The data are from a national survey of 1,425 local EMS directors that was conducted in 2006-2007.
  • Trends in Uninsurance among Rural Minority Children
    South Carolina Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2005
    Disparities in health insurance coverage for both minority and rural children persist, with children who are simultaneously minority race/ethnicity and living in rural areas being particularly disadvantaged. Using twenty-one years of data from the National Health Interview Survey to explore trends in health insurance and health services utilization for children between 1980 and 2001, and focusing on non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic African American, and Hispanic children, the authors found that rural children have been consistently less likely to have insurance than urban children, and minority status adds to the disparity. Several factors consistently influenced the odds that a child would lack health insurance, measured in 1980, 1986, 1994 and 2001. Compared to urban white children, rural white children and Hispanic children, both urban and rural, were more likely to lack insurance. Factors consistently associated with lack of health insurance, such as poverty, low education, and non-parental households, have been more prevalent among minority children since 1979, and remained so in 2001. Rural disadvantages for minority children are marked.