Rural Health Research Products

The full list of freely-available research products from the Rural Health Research Centers, including policy briefs, reports, chartbooks, interactive data websites, and more.

Browse Research Products:

Five Most Recent Research Products

  • Range Matters: Rural Averages Can Conceal Important Information
    Policy Brief
    North Carolina Rural Health Research and Policy Analysis Center
    This short brief uses three examples to demonstrate how focusing on averages without also considering the data range can conceal important information: 1) average rural hospital profitability, 2) distance from closed rural hospitals to the next closest hospital, and 3) HIV prevalence by county.
  • Illicit Drug and Opioid Use Disorders among Non-Metropolitan Residents
    Policy Brief
    Rural and Underserved Health Research Center
    We provide estimates of the prevalence of illicit drug and opioid use disorders among non-metropolitan adults ages 18-64. Prevalence rates did not decline from 2011-2013 to 2014-2015 despite the implementation of major substance use treatment policies. Of particular concern, heroin use disorder prevalence increased in recent years.
  • Perceived Treatment Need and Utilization for Illicit Drug and Opioid Use Disorders in Non-Metropolitan Areas
    Policy Brief
    Rural and Underserved Health Research Center
    The vast majority of non-metropolitan adults 18-64 who satisfy criteria for an illicit drug use or opioid use disorder do not perceive a need for treatment or receive formal substance use treatment. Despite policies to increase treatment access during the 2008-2015 study period, we found few changes in perceived treatment need and utilization.
  • Access to Care: Populations in Counties with No FQHC, RHC, or Acute Care Hospital
    Policy Brief
    North Carolina Rural Health Research and Policy Analysis Center
    To help provide a quick understanding of how many people may have more limited access to primary care and where they live, this brief focuses on three main primary care providers in rural areas (Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Health Centers, and acute care hospitals).
  • Rural-Urban Enrollment in Part D Prescription Drug Plans: June 2017 Update
    Policy Brief
    RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis
    As of June 2017, the percentage of rural enrollment in Part D plans, which include stand-alone prescription drug plans (PDPs) and Medicare Advantage with Prescription Drug (MA-PD) plans, lags urban enrollment despite significant growth overall in the number of Medicare beneficiaries with prescription drug coverage through Medicare Part D plans.