Stanley Xu, PhD

Phone: 303.636.3140
Email: Stan.Xu@kp.org

WICHE Rural Mental Health Research Center


Completed Projects - (1)

  • Identifying Stakeholders to Pay for Enhanced Depression Treatment in Rural Populations
    The goal of this project is to identify stakeholders who economically benefit when rural patients receive enhanced depression treatment, which will, in turn, encourage health plans to provide enhanced depression treatment to their rural enrollees without raising premiums.
    Research center: WICHE Center for Rural Mental Health Research
    Topics: Healthcare financing, Mental and behavioral health

Publications - (11)

2010

2009

2007

  • Preventing Hospitalizations in Depressed Rural Primary Care Patients
    WICHE Center for Rural Mental Health Research
    Date: 05/2007
    This study investigated the substitution of higher cost hospitalization for lower cost outpatient specialty care for depression and the extent to which insurance barriers impact service substitution patterns of outpatient specialty care for depression in rural and urban areas.

2006

  • Differential Effectiveness of Depression Disease Management for Rural and Urban Primary Care Patients
    WICHE Center for Rural Mental Health Research
    Date: 09/2006
    Is there a differential impact of enhanced depression care on patient outcomes in rural vs. urban primary care settings? Differences may be mediated by receiving evidence-based care (pharmacotherapy and specialty care counseling). Findings indicate that care for depression improved mental health for urban populations, but not rural patients.
  • Stakeholder Benefit From Depression Disease Management: Differences by Rurality?
    WICHE Center for Rural Mental Health Research
    Date: 2006
    Despite increasing consensus about the value of depression disease management programs, the field has not identified which stakeholders should absorb the relatively small additional costs associated with these programs. This paper investigates whether two stakeholder groups economically benefit from improved depression.

2005

Unknown year