Meredith Fordyce, PhD


Completed Projects - (1)

  • National Changes in Physician Supply
    This project describes the supply of allopathic and osteopathic physicians in rural and urban areas of the US. Study results will provide a current picture of rural physician supply and its variation by state and by region.
    Research center: WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Topics: International Medical Graduates (IMGs), Physicians, Workforce

Publications - (10)

  • 2005 Physician Supply and Distribution in Rural Areas of the United States (Full Report)
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 11/2007
    This study describes the 2005 supply and distribution of physicians (including osteopathic physicians and international medical graduates) with particular emphasis on generalists in rural areas. Results indicate variability in the rural-urban distribution of physicians, with generalist physicians playing prominent roles in rural areas.
  • 2005 Physician Supply and Distribution in Rural Areas of the United States (Project Summary)
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 11/2007
    This study describes the 2005 supply and distribution of physicians (including osteopathic physicians and international medical graduates) with particular emphasis on generalists in rural areas. Results indicate variability in the rural-urban distribution of physicians, with generalist physicians playing prominent roles in rural areas.
  • The Aging of the Rural Primary Care Physician Workforce: Will Some Locations Be More Affected than Others?
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 09/2013
    Reports that as the aging primary care physician population retires, rural provider shortages will be further exacerbated.
  • Inadequate Prenatal Care Among Racial and Ethnic Groups in the Rural United States, 2005
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2013

    Reports that in most states, rural minority racial/ethnic groups had levels of inadequate prenatal care (less than 50% of expected visits) in the “worst” or “worse than mid-range” categories.

  • Inadequate Prenatal Care in the Rural United States, 2005
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2013

    Reports that the states with levels of rural inadequate prenatal care (less than 50% of expected visits) in the “worst” or “worse than mid-range” categories were largely in southern and southwestern areas of the United States.

  • Low Birth Weight Rates Among Racial and Ethnic Groups in the Rural United States, 2005
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2013
    Reports that non-hispanic blacks generally had the highest rural low birth weight rates of all races/ethnicities, regardless of geographic location.
  • Low Birth Weight Rates in the Rural United States, 2005
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2013
    Reports that the rural U.S. low birth weight rate in 2005 was significantly higher than the urban U.S. low birth weight rate.
  • Prehospital Emergency Medical Services Personnel in Rural Areas: Results from a Survey in Nine States
    Report
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2015

    This study uses a survey of all ground-based prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) agencies in nine states (AR, FL, KS, MA, MT, NM, OR, SC, WI) to examine supply and demand for emergency response personnel, the involvement of medical directors, and the availability of medical consultation, in rural and urban agencies. Compared with urban EMS agencies, rural agencies had lower staff skill levels, higher reliance on volunteers, higher vacancy ratios, and less access to oversight and skill maintenance through regular interaction with a medical director and online medical consultation during emergency calls. Agencies in isolated small rural areas were the most distinct from other rural and urban agencies, having the most volunteers (both EMS providers and medical directors) and paid staff vacancies.

  • The U.S. Rural Physician Workforce: Analysis of Medical School Graduates from 1988-1997 (Final Report)
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2008
    Despite continued federal and state efforts to increase the number of physicians in rural areas, disparities between the supply of rural and urban physicians persist. This paper describes the training of the rural physician workforce in the United States and examines the variations in medical school and residency production of rural physicians.
  • Variability in General Surgical Procedures in Rural and Urban U.S. Hospital Inpatient Settings
    Report
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 03/2015

    This report addresses rural/urban differences in surgical practices in commonly performed inpatient surgical procedures that are typically handled by general surgeons. National Inpatient Sample data from rural and urban hospitals in 24 states were used to examine the frequency of general surgical procedures, complications during hospitalizations and predicted resource demand. Findings indicate that rural hospitals concentrated on relatively common, low complexity procedures that can be handled by general surgeons, especially if they have received additional training in obstetrics/gynecology and orthopedics. Resource demand, length of stay, complication rates and mortality were lower for patients undergoing common procedures in rural hospitals. Rural training tracks for general surgery that provide a high case load for common general surgery, obstetrics/gynecology and orthopedics procedures may help sustain the general surgery workforce in rural areas.