Kyle Muus, PhD


Completed Projects - (1)

  • U.S. Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions: A Rural/Urban Comparison
    This project will assess trends, patterns, and predictors of hospitalizations for three ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) (i.e., uncontrolled diabetes, bacterial pneumonia, and pediatric asthma) among rural and urban residents in the United States. The study will involve the examination of 2003 HCUP Nationwide Inpatient Sample data.
    Research center: FORHP-funded Individual Grantees
    Topics: Chronic diseases and conditions, Rural statistics and demographics

Publications - (10)

  • Chronic Disease and Functional Limitation Among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Reports the results of an analysis of chronic disease's effect on functional limitation from a survey of 7,107 Native elders representing 143 tribes from 77 sites.
  • Chronic Disease in American Indian/Alaska Native Elders
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Describes the prevalence of chronic diseases among Native American elders.
  • Effect of Outpatient Visits and Discharge Destination on Potentially Preventable Readmissions for Congestive Heart Failure and Bacterial Pneumonia
    Policy Brief
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 03/2012

    Explores the relationship between potentially preventable readmissions (PPRs) and (a) use of outpatient follow-up care, (b) discharge destination, (c) rural versus urban residence of the patient, and (d) time to follow-up care. These factors were examined in a large population of Medicare patients with a hospital stay for one of these prevalent diagnoses: congestive heart failure or bacterial pneumonia. Differences in readmission risk associated with outpatient visits and discharge destinations were calculated. Outpatient follow-up appears to be strongly influential in reducing PPRs, though fewer than half of the patients in the study had evidence of any kind of outpatient follow-up within 30 days. Home health care appeared to have less of an effect on reducing PPRs in rural areas relative to urban areas. Swing bed destination was associated with higher PPR risk, especially for pneumonia patients. Additional research should be done on encouragement of post-discharge follow-up care and types of outpatient interventions, access to outpatient and home health care, and use of swing beds in rural areas.

  • Effect of Outpatient Visits and Discharge Destination on Potentially Preventable Readmissions for Congestive Heart Failure and Bacterial Pneumonia (Final Report)
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 03/2012
    This study explored the relationship between PPRs and a) use of outpatient follow-up care, b) discharge destination, c) rural versus urban residence of the patient, and d) time to follow-up care.
  • Factors Associated With Incidence of Inappropriate Ambulance Transport in Rural Areas in Cases of Moderate to Severe Head Injury in Children
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    An analysis was conducted to identify a set of significant predictors of cases of inappropriate deliveries to acute care facilities with no trauma-center designation of any level. Greater distance to the nearest trauma center and shorter distance traveled by the ambulance squad to the receiving corresponded to higher probabilities of mistriage.
  • Geographic Differences in Potentially Preventable Readmission Rates in Rural and Urban Hospitals (Final Report)
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 11/2010
    Potentially preventable hospital readmissions (PPRs) among Medicare patients are examples of inefficiencies in the health care system. Policymakers are considering efforts to measure and publicly report preventable readmission rates and target hospitals with high rates for improvement by means of payment policy and technical assistance. To help inform the policy debate about readmissions of rural patients, this study estimated PPRs in three types of acute care hospitals: urban prospective payment system (PPS) hospitals, rural PPS hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs).
  • Health Risks Factors Among American Indians and Alaska Native Elders
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2006
    Chronic disease rates are higher among American Indian and Alaska Native elders although they exercise more and have higher rates of participation in multiple exercise activities. Research concerning the relationship between chronic disease and health risk factors is limited for American Indian and Alaska Native elder populations. This paper indicated results of an analysis of the effect of risk factors on chronic disease from a survey of 9,296 Native elders, representing 171 tribes from 88 sites. The sampling design employed systematic random sampling for larger tribes, with smaller tribes (fewer than 200) interviewing all or the majority of their elders. The data suggest that smokers, drinkers, and non-exercisers are at increase risk for chronic disease.
  • The Impact of Health Insurance Coverage on Native Elder Health: Implications for Addressing the Health Care Needs of Rural Native American Elders
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2007
    Examines health insurance coverage and access to healthcare among American Indian and Alaska Native elders (Native elders) -- defined as 55 years or older. Young elders, 55 to 64 years of age, are most likely to be uninsured with one-third reporting having no insurance, while 15% of older elders, 65 years of age and over, report they are uninsured. Uninsured Native elders are about twice as likely as insured Native elders to indicate they have no regular provider. In addition, one out of 10 Native elders report they were not able to get care when they needed it during the preceding 12 months. Reasons cited for not getting healthcare when it was needed included long waiting times, transportation problems, and cost. The authors conclude it is essential to develop policies that address the financial, geographical, and cultural aspects that negatively impact access to culturally appropriate healthcare. Full report available on request by contacting the Center.
  • Potentially Preventable Readmissions in Rural Hospitals
    Policy Brief
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 08/2009

    A hospital's potentially preventable readmission rate is a quality indicator receiving considerable attention from policymakers and payers. Using 3-M algorithm software and Medicare inpatient claims data from five states, this brief examines potentially preventable readmission rates for rural and urban hospitals, and discusses the rural implications of policy initiatives to reduce readmission rates.

  • Prevalence of Chronic Disease Among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2005
    Examines chronic disease prevalence and functional limitations among American Indian/Alaska Natives by rurality, gender, age, health care access, and health behaviors. Includes policy recommendations.