Aging

Journal Articles

Listed by publication date. You can also view these publications alphabetically.

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2015

2006

  • Health Risks Factors Among American Indians and Alaska Native Elders
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2006
    Chronic disease rates are higher among American Indian and Alaska Native elders although they exercise more and have higher rates of participation in multiple exercise activities. Research concerning the relationship between chronic disease and health risk factors is limited for American Indian and Alaska Native elder populations. This paper indicated results of an analysis of the effect of risk factors on chronic disease from a survey of 9,296 Native elders, representing 171 tribes from 88 sites. The sampling design employed systematic random sampling for larger tribes, with smaller tribes (fewer than 200) interviewing all or the majority of their elders. The data suggest that smokers, drinkers, and non-exercisers are at increase risk for chronic disease.

2005

  • Chronic Disease and Functional Limitation Among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    Reports the results of an analysis of chronic disease's effect on functional limitation from a survey of 7,107 Native elders representing 143 tribes from 77 sites.
  • Chronic Disease in American Indian/Alaska Native Elders
    Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005
    This journal article describes the prevalence of chronic diseases among Native American elders.
  • Providing Hospice Care in Rural Areas: Challenges and Strategies to Address Them
    University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2005

    Hospices in rural settings face challenges in the provision of hospice care as a result of their location and the size of their service area population. To ascertain the challenges that hospices face in serving rural communities, researchers conducted in-depth case studies of four different models of hospice care in rural areas. The authors describe strategies used by the case study hospices and recommend policies that could increase access to hospice care for rural Medicare beneficiaries and other rural residents. National initiatives to improve end-of-life care need to consider the special challenges faced by rural hospices.

2004

  • Rurality and Nursing Home Quality: Results from a National Sample of Nursing Home Admissions
    Southwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 10/2004
    There are higher percentages of elderly population in and the utilization rates of nursing homes are higher in rural areas. Overall, problems in rural nursing homes are at a much higher risk for poor outcomes, but it is most apparent in extremely isolated rural areas.
  • Do Rural Elders Have Limited Access to Medicare Hospice Services?
    University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center, Upper Midwest Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 05/2004
    Examines whether there are urban-rural differences in use of the Medicare hospice benefit before death and whether those differences suggest that there is a problem with access to hospice care for rural Medicare beneficiaries.

2001

2000

  • The Effect of the Doctor-Patient Relationship on Emergency Department Use Among the Elderly
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 01/2000
    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine the rate of emergency department use among the elderly and examined whether that use is reduced if the patient has a principal-care physician.
    METHODS: The Health Care Financing Administration's National Claims History File was used to study emergency department use by Medicare patients older than 65 years in Washington State during 1994. RESULTS: A total of 18.1% of patients had 1 or more emergency department visits during the study year; the rate increased with age and illness severity. Patients with principal-care physicians were much less likely to use the emergency department for every category of disease severity. After case mix, Medicaid eligibility, and rural/urban residence were controlled for, the odds ratio for having any emergency department visit was 0.47 for patients with a generalist principal-care physician and 0.58 for patients with a specialist principal-care physician.
    CONCLUSIONS: The rate of emergency department use among the elderly is substantial, and most visits are for serious medical problems. The presence of a continuous relationship with a physician--regardless of specialty--may reduce emergency department use.
  • Emergency Department Use by the Rural Elderly
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 2000
    This study uses Medicare data to compare emergency department (ED) use by rural and urban elderly beneficiaries. Given the similarity of diagnostic conditions associated with ED visits, rural EDs must be capable of dealing with the same range of emergency conditions as urban EDs.

1999

  • Rural and Urban Physicians: Does the Content of Their Medicare Practices Differ?
    WWAMI Rural Health Research Center
    Date: 1999
    Rural and urban areas have significant differences in the availability of medical technology, medical practice structures and patient populations. This study uses 1994 Medicare claims data to examine whether these differences are associated with variation in the content of practice between physicians practicing in rural and urban areas.